Understanding and Identifying Dissociation in Children and Adults

bump ;>)

Purposefully Scarred

Hidden Hurt explains how dissociation occurs in children:

The unconscious is like a great holding area or reservoir of unprocessed events. Anything we don’t or can’t assimilate consciously goes there. The unconscious holds irrelevant things such as images of strangers we see on the street. It also holds important things that need to be brought into conscious awareness but may be too big to fit our existing system (conscious mind). There are times when people are unable to fully assimilate the significance of an overwhelming experience such as a car accident. One of the passengers calmly calls an ambulance, administers first aid, and reroutes oncoming traffic. Once the ambulance arrives, she falls apart and cries hysterically. In order to take care of the immediate priorities, she dissociated her feelings and emotions temporarily. The dissociation allowed her to break up the oversized experience into manageable pieces. These were assimilated as soon…

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One thought on “Understanding and Identifying Dissociation in Children and Adults

  1. radicalhope says:

    Thanks for this article. I’m going to reblog it too.

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